Non-Surgical Root Canal

A root canal is the most common dental procedures performed in our office. This treatment can save your natural teeth and prevent the need for dental implants or bridges. At the center of your tooth is pulp. The pulp is a collection of blood vessels, nerves, and connective tissue that help to initially build the surrounding tooth. Infection of the pulp can be caused by trauma to the tooth, deep decay, cracks and fractures, or repeated dental procedures on the tooth. Symptoms of the infection can include swelling around the tooth, sensitivity to temperature, discomfort when chewing with the tooth, and spontaneous pain. If you experience any of these symptoms, your dentist may recommend root canal therapy to eliminate the diseased pulp.

How is a root canal performed?

Dr. Hamad will anesthetize your tooth to eliminate discomfort. The injured and/or diseased pulp is removed and the root canal system is thoroughly cleaned and sealed. This treatment may be completed in one or more visits depending on the treatment required. Success for this type of treatment ranges from 80 to 98 percent depending upon the severity of disease. If your tooth is not amenable to endodontic treatment or the chance of healing is unfavorable, you will be informed at the time of consultation or when a complication becomes evident during or after treatment.

What happens after treatment?

When your root canal therapy has been completed, a record of your treatment will be sent to your general dentist. You should contact their office for a final restoration within one week of completion at our office. Any delay in the placement of a permanent restoration can exert a negative influence on the outcome of root canal therapy. Your general dentist will decide what type of restoration is necessary to protect your tooth, but in most circumstances a full coverage restoration (such as a crown) will be recommended. It is rare for endodontic patients to experience post-operative complications after root canal therapy or microsurgery. However, if a problem does occur, you should contact our office as soon as possible.

How much will it cost?

The cost associated with root canal therapy can vary depending on multiple factors. Severity of damage to the affected tooth, the tooth which is affected, and history of previous root canal procedures can all affect the cost. In general, endodontic treatment is much less expensive than tooth removal and replacement with an artificial tooth. You will be informed of the cost prior to the initiation of treatment.

 

Healthy Root Canal
Healthy Root Canal
Diseased Root Canal
Diseased Root Canal
 
Tooth Cleaned and Shaped
Tooth Cleaned and Shaped
 
 
Tooth Restored with a Post and Core
Tooth Restored
with a Post and Core
 
Root Canal Completed
Root Canal Completed
 
Tooth Restored with Core and Crown
Tooth Restored
with Core and Crown

Endodontic Retreatment

With the proper care, your teeth that have had endodontic treatment will last as long as other natural teeth. Yet, a tooth that has received treatment may continue to exhibit disease or pain may continue to exist. This may occur months or years after treatment. If so, revisional therapy may be indicated.

Improper healing may be caused by:

  • Curved or narrow canals that were not treated during initial therapy
  • Complicated canals that went undetected during the initial treatment
  • The permanent restoration was not placed within the appropriate amount of time following the procedure
  • The permanent restoration did not prevent saliva from contaminating the inside of the tooth
  • Failure of the immune system to resolve the infection.

In some cases, new problems can influence a tooth that was previously treated:

  • Additional decay can expose the root canal filling material causing infection
  • A cracked or loose filling or crown can expose the tooth to new infection.

Once revisional therapy has been selected as the solution, Dr. Hamad will open your tooth to gain access to the root canal filling material. He will remove the existing filling material from the canals and carefully examine the inside of the tooth. Once clean, he will fill and seal the canals. You will need to return to your dentist as soon as possible in order to have a new restoration placed on the tooth.

 

 

New Disease
New Disease
Persistent Disease
Persistent Disease
 
Removal of Contaminated Filling
Removal of Contaminated Filling
 
Completed Retreatment with a Post and Core
Completed Retreatment with a Post and Core
 
Healing After Retreatment
Healing After Retreatment

Endodontic Microsurgery

Apicoectomy is the dental term for Endodontic surgery.

Why would I need an Apicoectomy?

To prevent tooth loss, root canal therapy is often all that is needed to save teeth with a diseased pulp. Occasionally, root canal therapy will not be sufficient to heal the tooth and your endodontist will recommend either revisional therapy or endodontic surgery. Endodontic surgery can be used to treat conditions that are inaccessible to conventional therapy. Damaged and/or infected root surfaces and the surrounding bone may also be treated with surgery. The most common surgery used to save damaged teeth is an apicoectomy or root-end resection.

What is an Apicoectomy?

An incision is made in the gum tissue to expose the root and surrounding inflamed tissue. The damaged tissue is removed along with the infected end of the root tip. A root-end filling is placed to seal the root canal and prevent re-infection of the root canal space. The gum tissue is then sutured back into place, allowing the bone to naturally heal around the root over a period of months restoring full function.

Following the procedure there may be some discomfort and/or swelling while the incision heals. This is normal for any surgical procedure. To alleviate any discomfort, an appropriate pain medication will be prescribed. If you have pain that does not respond to medication, please contact our office.

 

 

Persistent Apical Infection
Persistent Apical Infection
Removal of Infected Tissue
Removal of Infected Tissue
Immediate Post-Surgery
Immediate Post-Surgery
 
Healing Post Surgery
Healing Post Surgery

Traumatic Injury Treatment

Dislodged Teeth

Injuries to the mouth can cause teeth to be displaced from their natural position. Dr. Hamad or your general dentist may be able to reposition and stabilize your tooth. Root canal treatment may be needed within 7-10 days depending upon the extent of the injury. If the pulp remains healthy, further treatment may not be necessary; however, if the pulp becomes damaged or infected, root canal therapy will be required.

Avulsed (Knocked Out) Teeth

If an injury causes a tooth to be completely knocked out of your mouth, it is important that you are treated immediately! If this happens to you, keep the tooth moist. A tooth can be saved if it remains moist and treatment is rendered in an hour or less. If possible, put it back into the socket. You may even put the tooth in a glass of milk. The length of time the tooth was out of your mouth and the way the tooth was stored may influence the type of treatment you receive. Please click on the link below for the Traumatic Injury Instructions.

Luxation with Bone Fracture
Luxation with Bone Fracture
Avulsion
Avulsion
Avulsion 2
Avulsion 2
Save-A-Tooth
Save-A-Tooth

 

Root Canal vs Implants

Which is right for me?

A controversy in the dental community currently exists concerning the success rate of root canal therapy when compared with that of implant treatment. Saving your natural tooth should always be your first choice when dental care is needed. Nothing, not even the most advanced bridges and implants, can truly replace your natural tooth. If your dentist recommends extracting your tooth, ask if it can be saved with an endodontic procedure, also known as root canal treatment. Endodontic treatment removes the injured pulp (soft inner tissue) of your tooth and fills and seals the space. Your tooth is then restored and can function just like any other tooth for the rest of your life, ensuring comfortable chewing and a natural appearance

If your tooth cannot be saved - and some cannot - you may consider replacements such as a bridge or dental implant. Your options may depend upon the condition of surrounding teeth and bone structure. Dental implant procedures can be complex, costly and they often require several visits and up to a year of healing before the procedure can be completed.

At the heart of the controversy is the definition of success. Dental implants are a very valuable in the replacement of missing teeth; however, their success is determined quite differently than that of root canal therapy. With implants, success can have many different definitions, including those that would be considered by many clinicians and patients as failure. The definition of success with root canal therapy is generally defined as a functional tooth with no symptoms and no evidence of disease.

That being said, the success rates of both procedures are very comparable, even with the inaccuracy of the definitions. The goal of root canal therapy is to preserve your natural teeth, where as implants are more geared toward replacing missing teeth or replacing teeth which are not amenable to root canal therapy.

Having root canal therapy does not prevent you from having implant therapy if needed in the future; however, implant therapy does preclude you from any procedure that would maintain your natural tooth.

Dr. Hamad is available to consult with you and your dentist in determining the right course of treatment for you.

Nothing is as good as your natural tooth!

 

Implant
Implant
Restoration with Implants
Restoration with Implants